Best Texas Roadhouse Sauteed Mushrooms: Easy Recipe

Is there anything more tantalizing than the earthy, rich flavor of sautéed mushrooms? This copycat recipe for Texas Roadhouse-style sautéed mushrooms is here to serve up a slice of that legendary taste right at your dining table.

Not only is this recipe bursting with flavor, but it’s also incredibly easy to whip up, using ingredients you probably already have tucked away in your pantry. So strap in and step into the wonderful world of sauteed mushrooms, where simplicity meets deliciousness.

Side view of Texas Roadhouse style sautéed mushrooms in a serving dish.
Side view spotlight on our star – Texas Roadhouse styled sautéed mushrooms!

Why This Recipe Works

This Texas Roadhouse sautéed mushrooms recipe has got all the right moves. It’s easy, adaptable, and downright tasty. Plus, it uses pantry staples.

  • Simplicity: With this recipe, simplicity is the real star. A handful of basic ingredients is all it takes to create a simple side dish that steals the show.
  • Versatility: Whether it’s jazzing up a steak, complementing chicken, or acting as a standalone side, these sautéed mushrooms fit right in. Talk about wearing many hats!
  • Accessibility: No exotic ingredients to chase after. Everything you need is likely sitting in your kitchen pantry right now.

Any mushroom lover will be over the moon with this Texas Roadhouse mushroom recipe!

Juicy steak served with a side of golden Texas Roadhouse sautéed mushrooms.
Steak and mushrooms, a match made in flavor heaven!

The Origin and Popularity

Texas Roadhouse, since its inception in the late 90s, has won hearts with its sautéed mushrooms. The appeal? Their uncomplicated, rustic charm that reminds you of home cooking. Two decades later, the love for these golden nuggets of joy hasn’t faded but has rather grown stronger. Why? It’s the simple things done well that leave a lasting impression, after all.

The blend of hearty mushrooms, sizzling in a symphony of olive oil and butter, kissed with garlic and deglazed with a splash of white wine, all come together to create a perfect dish that’s not just food, but an experience. Every bite speaks volumes about its simplicity and depth, singing praises of its humble beginnings. This recipe brings out the best in every mushroom, proving that often, less truly is more.

Beyond taste, these steakhouse mushrooms bring with them an array of health benefits. Mushrooms are packed with nutrients, including B vitamins, selenium, and potassium. Plus, with their high fiber content, they make a satisfying addition to your meals. So not only are you in for a delicious treat, but your body will thank you too. Now, that’s what we call a win-win!

Top view of Texas Roadhouse style sautéed mushrooms in a serving dish.
Your favorite steakhouse’s secret, served right in your kitchen!

Ingredients

  • Mushrooms: You can choose from white button, cremini, or baby bella mushrooms. Just remember, the fresher, the better!
  • Olive oil: Just a tablespoon of this liquid gold is enough to get the sauté party started!
  • Butter: Unsalted butter, the secret behind the recipe’s rich, mouthwatering taste.
  • Garlic: finely chopped. If you don’t have fresh garlic, don’t panic! You can substitute with a garlic powder.
Bowl of minced garlic and a heap of freshly chopped parsley.
Garlic and parsley duo, the dynamic flavor boosters.
  • Salt and black pepper: Add these according to your taste preference. Remember, you’re the boss in your kitchen!
  • White wine: Around half a cup to deglaze the pan and add an extra layer of flavor to our mushrooms.
  • Worcestershire Sauce: Adds a wonderful complexity to the dish without overpowering the star ingredient, the mushrooms.
  • Soy Sauce: Just a splash can elevate your mushrooms from good to great.
  • Fresh Herbs: Fresh herbs, like parsley, thyme, or rosemary, are a simple way to impart vibrant flavors and add an aesthetic touch to your sautéed mushrooms. The delicate, slightly peppery notes of parsley, for instance, can provide a refreshing counterpoint to the hearty mushrooms.
Close-up view of fresh button and cremini mushrooms.
Button and cremini mushrooms posing for their flavor-packed future.

Equipment

All you need to make these delicious sautéed mushrooms is:

  • A cutting board and a knife: To chop those garlic cloves and slice the mushrooms.
  • A large skillet or frying pan: It gives your mushrooms enough space to get that golden-brown perfection!
  • A wooden spatula: For stirring our beautiful ingredients together.
  • Measuring spoons and cups: Because cooking is part art, part science.
A large, shiny pan heating up on a modern stove.
Where all the sautéing saga begins – the humble stove and pan.

Preparation Steps

  1. Clean those Mushrooms: Start by gently brushing any dirt off your mushrooms with a damp paper towel. Remember, they’re sponges, so don’t soak them in water.
  2. Slice ’em up: Next, slice your mushrooms. Not too thin, not too thick, just right at about 1/4 inch. Cut your mushrooms into evenly-sized pieces of mushroom to ensure uniform cooking.
Close-up of chopped fresh mushrooms on a wooden cutting board.
Welcome to the chop shop – where fresh mushrooms get their makeover.

Cooking Instructions

  1. Heat Things Up: Warm your skillet over medium-high heat and add the olive oil. Got it shimmering? Great, you’re on the right track!
  2. Melt Butter: Toss in the butter and let it melt. Oh, the beautiful aroma of melted butter!
  3. Garlic’s Grand Entrance: Add the finely chopped garlic and sauté it for about 30 seconds. You’re just waking up the flavor. But be careful not to burn it!
  4. Cooking Mushrooms: Add the sliced mushrooms to the pan, giving them room to breathe. Cook for around 5-7 minutes or until they’re golden brown and slightly crispy. Cooking time varies slightly depending on the size and type of mushrooms.
  5. Season to Taste: Now’s the time to add your salt and pepper. Remember, you can always add more, but you can’t take it away!
  6. Wine Time: Pour in the white wine and let it cook until most of the liquid has evaporated, leaving behind a rich, deep flavor.
  7. Serve and Savor: Once cooked, serve your mushrooms hot. Whether as a side dish or a steak topping, you’re now a part of the Texas Roadhouse legacy!
Browning of fresh mushrooms in a hot pan with butter.
Magic unfolds as mushrooms get their golden tan!

Alterations and Substitutions

This recipe is flexible. Feel free to tweak it according to your preferences:

  • Swap fresh garlic for garlic powder.
  • Substitute butter with a vegan alternative for a vegan-friendly version.
  • Mix and match different types of mushrooms for a unique flavor twist.
Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, and fresh herbs on a kitchen table.
Our secret flavor enhancers – ready to jazz up the mushrooms.

Choosing the Best Mushrooms

When it comes to mushrooms, be picky. The quality of your fungus friends can make or break the dish. Let’s walk through how to choose the best mushrooms and which types work best for sautéing.

  1. Look for Freshness: Picking the freshest mushrooms is crucial for a flavor-packed dish. For best results, ensure that your fresh mushrooms are firm, with smooth surfaces and free from any slime or bruising. The caps should be free from any dark spots or sliminess. The gills, which are underneath the cap, should be clean and dry. It’s okay if they are a bit brown, but avoid those with wet or dark gills.
  2. Button Mushrooms: If you’re a beginner, these are your best bet. Button mushrooms are the most common type and offer a subtle flavor, which is great for a simple sauté. They also have a relatively firm texture, which holds up well to sautéing.
  3. Cremini Mushrooms: Cremini, or baby bella mushrooms, are a step up from button mushrooms in terms of flavor. They offer a deeper, earthier taste, which can really elevate your dish. They’re perfect for this recipe.
  4. Shiitake Mushrooms: For an Asian twist, go for Shiitake mushrooms. They provide a unique, umami flavor that makes the dish interesting. However, remember to remove the stems before cooking as they can be tough and chewy.
  5. Portobello Mushrooms: These are mature Cremini mushrooms and have a meatier texture. Their large size can make for a chunkier sauté. However, they contain a lot of water and can release a lot of moisture while cooking, so you might need to adjust your cooking time.
  6. Unsuitable Mushrooms: Mushrooms like morels or chanterelles, while delicious, are not ideal for this recipe. They have a unique flavor profile and texture that can be lost when sautéed with other ingredients.
  7. Know Your Source: Finally, always buy your mushrooms from a reliable grocer or, better yet, a local farmer’s market. This will ensure you’re getting the freshest, top-quality mushrooms for your sauté.
An assortment of fresh mushrooms – button, cremini, and shiitake.
Meet the mushroom family, ready for their sautéing debut!


Expert Tips and Troubleshooting

Having some hiccups in the kitchen? Let’s tackle them head-on:

  • Controlling Saltiness: Aim to use unsalted butter. The best way to ensure consistent results is to use unsalted butter, so you can control the salt level.
  • Adding Depth: Don’t forget to deglaze the pan with a bit of white wine. It’s like inviting your mushrooms to a flavor party.
  • Dealing with Watery Mushrooms: If your mushrooms are acting like sponges and releasing too much liquid, it’s time to rethink your strategy. Try sautéing them in smaller batches or use a larger pan to give them some space to breathe.
  • Achieving Perfect Browning: Mushrooms playing hard to get and refusing to brown? Turn up the heat or let them sizzle a bit longer.
  • Preventing Stickiness: Mushrooms clinging on to your pan for dear life? They might just need a bit more oil or butter.
  • Releasing Much Moisture: If your mushrooms are releasing much moisture, consider sautéing in smaller batches.
  • Mushroom Firmness: Go for mushrooms that are firm and smooth to the touch.
  • Mushroom Surface: Avoid mushrooms that are slimy or have dark spots. Fresh is best!
  • Type of Mushroom: Whether you go for white, cremini, or baby bella, a good mushroom is the soul of this dish. Button mushrooms, with their delicate flavor and texture, are a favorite for this dish.
  • Smaller Mushrooms: If you’re using smaller mushrooms, you can leave them whole for a different texture.
Baked potato generously topped with sautéed mushrooms.
When baked potato met sautéed mushrooms, it was love at first bite!

Serving Suggestions

Wondering what to pair with your sautéed mushrooms? Here are some top-notch options:

  • Classic Pairing: Serve as a side dish with steak or chicken. Mushrooms are a great way to make steaks shine.
  • Comfort Food Twist: Use them as a topping for baked potatoes or fluffy rice. The earthy flavor of the mushrooms and the crispiness of a baked potato is a great combination.
  • Pizza Topping: Why not scatter them over a pizza for a gourmet touch?
  • Sandwich Filling: Elevate your sandwich game by adding sautéed mushrooms as a filling. A tasty way to improve your snack.
  • Pasta Mix-In: Mix them into your favorite pasta for an earthy flavor kick.
Toasted slice of bread topped with golden-brown Texas Roadhouse sautéed mushrooms.
Mushrooming your taste buds with this rustic toast topping!

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you make sautéed mushrooms in advance?

Indeed, you can! Just ensure they’re properly reheated before serving to maintain the best flavor and texture.

Should you salt mushrooms when sautéing?

The trick is to add the salt towards the end of cooking. This helps the mushrooms retain their juicy texture and prevents them from releasing too much water.

Do you have to wash mushrooms before cooking?

Yes, but do it gently. Mushrooms are like sponges and can absorb a lot of water which could affect their texture when cooked.

How long will sautéed mushrooms last in the fridge?

Your sautéed mushrooms can comfortably chill in the fridge for up to two days. Make sure they’re stored in a covered container to maintain their freshness.

How do you sauté mushrooms so they are crispy?

The secret lies in high heat, not overcrowding the pan, and letting the mushrooms sit undisturbed so they can get a nice, crispy sear.

Why is it called sautéed?

“Sautéed” is a term borrowed from French that means “jumped” or “bounced”. It’s a reference to the quick, high heat cooking method used in sautéing.

Is it better to sauté mushrooms in oil or butter?

Both work well, but butter can add a rich, creamy note. However, be cautious with your heat as butter can burn more easily than oil.

Why do sautéed mushrooms taste so good?

The magic is in the method. High heat and simple seasonings bring out the deep, earthy flavors of the mushrooms, unlocking their umami goodness.

Can you overcook sautéed mushrooms?

Yes, it’s possible. Overcooked mushrooms can become rubbery, so it’s best to keep a watchful eye on them while they’re in the pan.

Should you sauté mushrooms without oil?

While it’s technically possible, it’s not recommended. Without oil or butter, mushrooms risk sticking to the pan or drying out.

How do you sauté mushrooms like a chef?

The key is to use high heat, don’t overcrowd the pan, and let the mushrooms develop a nice brown color before flipping or stirring them.

Can I sauté mushrooms without boiling?

Absolutely! In fact, sautéing is preferred for mushrooms as it brings out their flavors better and gives them a lovely texture. Boiling mushrooms can make them a bit too soggy for most people’s liking.

Storage

Storing leftover mushrooms is a piece of cake:

  • Short-Term Storage: Sautéed mushrooms can be safely stored in the fridge for up to two days.
  • Preventing Bacteria: To play it safe, give your leftover mushrooms a quick cook before storing them. This will help kill off any bacteria on the surface.
  • Reheating: Reheat leftover mushrooms in a pan over medium heat or microwave them until warmed through.
Close-up of sautéed mushrooms in a clear glass storage container.
Where flavor meets convenience – our sautéed mushrooms ready for the fridge!

Final Words

As we close the curtain on this mushroom saga, let’s take a quick sauté, I mean, survey, of what we’ve cooked up:

  • Mushroom Choices: Button to cremini to shiitake, we know what works.
  • Perfect Sauté: Browning is key, and patience is a must.
  • Essential Tools: A simple kitchen pan does wonders.
  • Serving & Storing: How to present and preserve for maximum delight.

So, gear up! With these tips, you’re ready to create a sautéed spectacle even a steakhouse would admire. Your culinary adventure awaits!

Close-up view of sautéed mushrooms with fresh parsley garnish in a rustic serving dish.

Texas Roadhouse Sautéed Mushrooms Copycat Recipe

7737f8c28c2cc5158e14eaf64d376635Apron Ace
Sautéed mushrooms – a tantalizing, flavor-packed side dish that transforms humble mushrooms into the superstar of your meal. Prepared with fresh button and cremini mushrooms, this recipe is easy, quick, and downright delicious.
With the added depth from Worcestershire and soy sauce, and an aromatic touch of garlic and fresh herbs, this sautéed mushroom recipe is your ticket to an elevated dining experience. Ideal as a hearty side dish or a topping for steaks and potatoes. Make them once, and you'll keep coming back for more!
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 4 people
Calories 127 kcal

Equipment

  • Large Pan
  • Cooking Spatula
  • kitchen knife
  • cutting board

Ingredients
 
 

  • 1 lbs Cremini (or baby bella mushrooms, white mushrooms or button mushrooms)
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 2 tbsp Unsalted Butter
  • 2 cloves Garlic (minced)
  • 1/4 cup White Wine
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tbsp Soy Sauce
  • Salt (to taste)
  • Black Pepper (to taste)
  • Fresh Herbs (like parsley, optional)

Instructions
 

Preparation

  • Start by gently brushing any dirt off your mushrooms with a damp paper towel. Remember, they're sponges, so don't soak them in water.
  • Next, slice your mushrooms. Not too thin, not too thick, just right at about ¼ inch.

Cooking

  • Heat the olive oil in your large pan over medium heat. Arrange the mushrooms in a single layer in the pan.
  • Let the mushrooms cook undisturbed for about 5 minutes until they turn golden brown on one side. Flip them over to brown the other side.
  • Lower the heat to medium-low, add the butter, minced garlic, Worcestershire sauce, and soy sauce. Stir everything together, cooking for another 2-3 minutes.
  • Turn up the heat to medium-high, pour in the white wine. Allow it to simmer and reduce by half. This is also your chance to scrape up any brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pan.
  • Season with salt and pepper. Remember that the Worcestershire and soy sauces are already salty.
  • Once the wine has reduced, remove the pan from the heat. Your sautéed mushrooms are ready to be served! Sprinkle with fresh herbs.

Video

Notes

  • Mushroom Selection: White, cremini, or baby bella mushrooms are recommended. Each variety of mushroom offers a unique flavor and texture, so feel free to experiment.
  • Sauce and Salt: The Worcestershire and soy sauces are salty. Be cautious when adding additional salt.
  • Wine Alternative: If white wine isn’t available, you can use red wine or broth. The purpose is to deglaze the pan and add more flavor.
  • Butter Choice: Unsalted butter is used to give you control over the salt content.
  • Look for Freshness: Picking the freshest mushrooms is crucial for a flavor-packed dish. For best results, ensure that your fresh mushrooms are firm, with smooth surfaces and free from any slime or bruising. The caps should be free from any dark spots or sliminess. The gills, which are underneath the cap, should be clean and dry. It’s okay if they are a bit brown, but avoid those with wet or dark gills.
  • Dealing with Watery Mushrooms: If your mushrooms are acting like sponges and releasing too much liquid, it’s time to rethink your strategy. Try sautéing them in smaller batches or use a larger pan to give them some space to breathe.
  • Achieving Perfect Browning: Mushrooms playing hard to get and refusing to brown? Turn up the heat or let them sizzle a bit longer.
  • Preventing Stickiness: Mushrooms clinging on to your pan for dear life? They might just need a bit more oil or butter.
  • Releasing Much Moisture: If your mushrooms are releasing much moisture, consider sautéing in smaller batches.
  • Storage Tips: The sautéed mushrooms can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. For the best experience, reheat before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 127kcalCarbohydrates: 7gProtein: 3gFat: 9gSaturated Fat: 4gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 4gTrans Fat: 0.2gCholesterol: 15mgSodium: 315mgPotassium: 570mgFiber: 1gSugar: 3gVitamin A: 178IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 32mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Mushrooms, Sauteed Mushrooms, Texas Roadhouse
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